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3 Ways To Eat Singapore’s Most Hated Veggies

August 31, 2017

If we asked you, “Which vegetable do you hate the most?”, what would your answer be?

We polled our friends to find out which vegetables are most unpopular to the Singaporean palate. Some responses we received:

Coriander
“Tastes like dead cockroaches”

Cauliflower
“Smells like fart”

Eggplant/Aubergine/Brinjal
“Like eating a slimy, gooey alien baby”

Celery
“Avoid like the plague unless you have lots and lots of cream cheese”

 

In the end, three vegetables stood out more than the others. They were:

 

Singapore’s Most Hated Vegetable

No. 3: BEANSPROUTS
“That RAW taste … eeeyurh!”

No. 2: OKRA (LADY’S FINGERS)
“This isn’t for eating. It’s for art classes!”

No. 1: BITTERGOURD
“Something this bitter has got to be poisonous”

 

If, like many of our friends, you hate any of the above vegetables, we promise the recipes below will change your opinions about them.

This Vietnamese crepe will fill you up with lots of fibre and protein. Done right, you won’t be able to taste the beansprouts! A little bit of coconut milk is used here but you may substitute it with skimmed milk.

Bahnxeo1Bahnxeo2Bahnxeo3

BAHN XEO
For the crepes (makes 4)
1/3 cup
flour
1 tsp
turmeric
1/2 tsp
salt
1 tbsp
finely chopped spring onion
1/3 cup
water
1/3 cup
coconut water
For the fillings
25g
beansprouts, remove the tails
8
fresh prawns, shelled, de-veined and halved sideways
50g
lean pork fillet, cut into thin strips
1 tsp
minced garlic
Salt & pepper to taste
Some fresh mint leaves
Some fresh red chilli
Some chopped spring onions
1 wedge
fresh lime
4
lettuce leaves
Steps
1

To make the crepes:
1. Mix all the ingredients in a large bowl. Whisk until smooth.
2. Lightly wipe a non-stick pan with some oil.
3. On medium heat, pour about 1/4 cup of batter into the pan and move it around to create a thin crepe.
4. Cook one side for about 4 - 5 minutes, then, using an offset spatula, carefully lift it from the pan and flip it. Cook the other side for about 4 - 5 minutes.
5. Set the crepe skin aside on a plate.

2

To make the fillings:
1. Blanch the beansprouts in boiling water for about 10 seconds. Drain using a colander and dunk the sprouts in a bowl of ice cold water. Drain, pat dry with a paper towel, and set aside.
2. Sauté the garlic in a pan and add prawns and pork. Add salt and pepper to taste. Once cooked, remove from pan and set aside to cool.

3

Assembly:
1. Fill a crepe with some beansprouts, prawns and pork.
2. Top off with some mint leaves, spring onions and fresh chilli.
3. Squeeze some lime juice over the fillings and then fold crepe in half to form a packet.
4. Use a lettuce leaf to wrap the crepe and then eat the whole thing using your hand.

If your reason for not liking okra is the slimy insides, this recipe will change your mind about it. This is also a healthier alternative to regular fries.

Okrafries1Okrafries2

OVEN-BAKED OKRA FRIES
Ingredients
7 okras
sliced in half lengthwise
1/2 tsp
ground cumin
1/2 tsp
ground coriander
1/2 tsp
turmeric
1/2 tsp
cayenne pepper
Dash
black pepper
Pinch
salt
2
beaten eggs
1 bowl
panko crumbs
Steps
1

Heat the oven to 220C and lay a baking sheet on a tray.

2

Combine ingredients from okras to salt in a large mixing bowl.

3

Pick up one okra, dip it into the egg solution, and then coat it in panko crust.

4

Repeat until you’ve done the same to all the okras.

5

Bake okras in the oven for 30 minutes or until okras turn golden brown.

A healthy, sugar-free treat for when the weather becomes unbearably hot!

Bittergourd3Bittergourd1

BITTERGOURD POPSICLES
Makes 6 popsicles
1
baby bitter gourd, cut into small pieces
1
green apple, cut into small pieces
1
stalk of kale, take the leafy part only
A handful
fresh mint leaves
200ml
fresh coconut water
Steps
1

Blend everything until you get a smoothie.

2

Pour smoothie into popsicle mould.

3

Freeze overnight and unmould before eating.